Waitress turns the tables on bad tippers - AmericaNowNews.com

Waitress turns the tables on bad tippers

Have you ever not left a tip at a restaurant or bar?  It's the customer's right, but now a Memphis waitress is turning the tables on patrons who leave her with little cash.

Waitress Megan Humphrey says her hard work does not always produce the payoff she expects.

"For every good customer we have, we probably have like six bad ones that come in," she says.

Fed up with zeros on the tip line, Humphrey started offering tips of her own - on Facebook.

"It was just something that I did because I was just so mad in the moment," she explains.

In fact, Humphrey goes way beyond just calling out customers, and actually posts pictures of her tip-less receipts.

"I just got sick of it, so I took pictures to show people, like, I got zero dollars on $117 and gave them perfect service," she says.

Author Emily Yellin, who wrote a book about customer service, says in this case, customers aren't always right.

"Waiters and waitresses have never really had a way to talk back to somebody who gives them a bad tip, and I guess the Internet now is providing that with social media," she notes.

But is Humphrey's perfect revenge on Facebook legal? Rick Harlow, Special Agent-In-Charge of the U.S. Secret Service's Memphis office, saw Humphrey's posts and says she is not breaking any federal laws. But he did offer some advice: "While it's not illegal, at least from my standpoint, it's certainly not very smart, and it's not very ethical. But we don't legislate ethics," he says.
 
According to Harlow, the private information Humphrey is posting probably will not put her customers at risk for fraud or financial loss.
 
"It only gives a few digits on the credit card," he says. "It does say the type of credit card, but it doesn't identify the bank or the account number."
 
And in order for her customers to sue her for invasion of privacy, they would have to incur damages beyond just being called out online.  Attorney Jim Summers says that's unlikely.

"And then the other question is, if it's not an invasion privacy, could you put up something in essence and say, 'Somebody is cheap.' The answer is yes," he says.

So what does Megan Humphrey hope to accomplish by calling out customers on Facebook?  
 
"I just want people to be educated on the tipping," she says. "Be educated about it and realize that we don't make minimum wage. That's the main thing. Just realize that we do make $2.13 an hour! We don't make anything, really."
 
And, she added, if you can't afford to reward good service -- stay home!
 
"I don't think they should go out to eat in my opinion," she says. "I mean, it's just not fair to me."

Humphrey's Facebook page is private, so only friends can see the receipts she posts. But what do YOU think?

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