Freezing fruits and vegetables - AmericaNowNews.com

How to freeze your fruits and vegetables

Most fruits and vegetables can be frozen, but you can't just cut them up and toss them in the freezer. You wash and trim them like you would if you were eating it fresh. Then you blanch them to slow the aging.

Blanching involves cooking your produce slightly in steam or boiling water.

"The enzymatic process is what causes changes in the flavor, color, texture and why a vegetable doesn't stay good forever," said Valerie Waters, Martin's Registered Dietician.

Then you cool the produce in an ice bath, drain it and dry it. We've all frozen strawberries only to have them turn to mush when defrosted. That's because fruit holds a lot of water. Water expands in the freezer, which bursts cell walls. A sugar solution or ascorbic acid will help keep the texture intact.

"With fruit it's a good idea to eat it when it's a little bit frozen so that's while it's ideal to make smoothies and those kinds of things with frozen fruit rather than defrosting it completely and expecting it to be the same quality as it was before you froze it," Waters said.

The same can happen to vegetables, but it won't be an issue if you use them while cooking.

Not everything can be frozen. Avoid citrus fruits like oranges, lemons and limes. Maintaining a constant temperature is key. And make sure you store them in a moisture-resistant container.

You can freeze them as a bunch or if you know you'll only need a few at a time, lay them out on a cookie sheet and freeze them individually. It'll be easier to grab that handful when you go to cook them.

Frozen fruits and vegetables usually last about six months and cook in half the time compared to fresh produce. You can find a full list of what can be frozen and how to do it by clicking here.

Copyright 2012 America Now. All rights reserved.

  • Most Popular StoriesMost Popular StoriesMore>>

  • Physicians warn against giving melatonin to children

    Physicians warn against giving melatonin to children

    Parents desperate to get their troubled sleepers to bed are turning to synthetic melatonin, which is a supplement sold over the counter. But expert warn it could have adverse effects on child development.
    Many adults turn to sleep aids like melatonin, but now more parents are giving them to their kids, too. We talked to physicians to see what they had to say about how it could affect your child's development.
  • Six deadly foods for dogs

    Six deadly foods for dogs

    Every pet owner knows a dog can get into just about anything around the house. One woman found that out the hard way when her dog ate a bunch of grapes! Turns out, that's one of the most dangerous foods
    Every pet owner knows a dog can get into just about anything around the house. But these common snacks could be fatal for Fido.
  • Wiping the "sleep" from your eyes

    Why not to wipe the "sleep" from your eyes

    The Sandman may lull you to sleep, but he also leaves a few sprinkles behind in the corners of your eyes. People call it sleep, eye goop, crusties or sand, but no matter what you call it, the gunk keeps
    The Sandman may lull you to sleep, but he also leaves a few sprinkles behind in the corners of your eyes. People call it sleep, eye goop, crusties or sand, and no matter what you call it, it always appears after you've awoken.
Powered by WorldNow