iSlice: Does it Work? - AmericaNowNews.com

iSlice: Does it Work?

How many times have you purchased an item just to find it nearly impossible to get it out of the plastic packaging without risk of cutting yourself?  The iSlice tool promises to make slicing those tough plastic packages a breeze.   It's not a single-tasker either.  It claims that it can cut coupons and newspapers just to name a few.  This is all great, if the iSlice actually works.

Ironically, the iSlice comes in the very same plastic packaging that it's designed to slice.  I need the scissors at least one more time to cut out the iSlice.  And it says it won't cut skin, which is a big advantage over the scissors, we'll get to that later though....

So looking at the tool, I find a light weight but sturdy blue plastic handle with a little ceramic blade just nudging out of the silver magnetic tip.  I first test it on paper products, slicing out a photo from a newspaper.  I find it very simple to use, and in seconds the photo is cut right out from the paper.

I have similar luck cutting pieces from the glossy paper of a magazine.  However, I notice it leaving marks on the table.  I correct this by placing some felt underneath my item being cut to protect it from scratching the table.  Even with coupons, in four swipes I'm ready for saving!  The cardboard coupon from a box of food requires more pressure, but it comes free too, faster than with scissors.  The construction paper and cardstock slice instantly too.  I can cut it with a nice clean edge or with limited pressure I can just score it.

I'm able to slice the thin plastic off a new DVD and I can cut open a protective plastic bag to extract some TV manuals.  This all done swiftly with the iSlice.  The key to ultimate success lies within whether or not it can handle slicing the thick, tough plastic.

I use the iSlice to cut around the edges of a future "Does it Work?" project.  The iSlice conforms to the shape of the packaging and cuts right around the edge.  In less than ten seconds, I have my headphone set out of the plastic contraption, safe and cut free!  I would never be able to navigate scissors around the packaging an open it as easily as I am able to get with the iSlice.

I'm reluctant to injure myself to test the "won't cut your skin" claim but it's for the greater good.  So I try to slice the side of my finger with it to check that claim.  Even if I do push pretty hard, it doesn't cut my skin.  It leaves some marks, but no cuts!

With all ten fingers intact, I store the iSlice on the fridge with the built in magnet on the tip.  The results of this test are clear.  The iSlice easily cuts to a YES for this test.

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