Why your job is making you fat - AmericaNowNews.com

Why your job is making you fat

Admit it. You've Hoovered up your lunch at your desk and snuck one or maybe two of a co-worker's birthday brownies. And if your weight is paying the price, you're not alone. Thanks to shrinking lunch hours and growing workloads, more and more employees blame their jobs for making them fat.

Have you ever thought about how many steps you actually take in a day? If you're stuck at the office, you might be surprised at how little you're actually moving.

Kelly Maddox is fighting back against the bulge. Three to four days a week, Kelly locks up her boutique and books it to Curves.

"Thirty minutes; in and out," says Maddox.

Between work, family and life, Kelly says it's always a battle against the clock.

"Coming in and out in 30 minutes is really important to me," she explains. "I don't like laying in the tanning bed for 15 minutes because I feel like I should be somewhere else, but everybody can dedicate 30 minutes three times a week for themselves, for their health, for their stress level, for their families."

Personal Trainer Chal Lester agrees.

"You don't have to go crazy working out six or seven days a week, but three to four days is very effective," he says.

Even if you can't make it out of your cubicle for lunch, create a "work" workout. Yes, you might get some crazy stares from your coworkers, but you'll be surprised how quickly you can feel the burn.

Try wall pushups, jumping jacks, curls with dumbbells or resistance bands and even try swapping out your chair for a resistance ball.

Lester also showed us an exercise where all you need is a wall. It might not look like much, but this move will blast your lower body. (Watch the video above to see how easy it is!)

And let's talk about the never-ending snacks that seem to magically appear in the break room. We all know it can be a difficult temptation not to give in, so just think moderation -- not deprivation.

"If you're having an issue eating junk and sweets, put a time value on your treadmill," says Lester. "If I eat that cake, that's two hours on the treadmill. So you start looking at food different. And it is ok; don't feel guilty, but just know you'll have to do a little work to get it back."

Last but not least, drink water and lots of it.

"What I suggest is you always keep a water bottle at your desk and you're constantly drinking from it. That helps with your hydration but also if you have to go to the bathroom more, you'll get out of your chair," says Dietitian Natalie Martinez.

And for Kelly, who made fitness her commitment 15 years ago, she says it's more than just a physical release.

"Exercise is so important, not only for your body, but for your mind. When you come through that door it doesn't matter what kind of mood you're in [because] when you leave you're in a great mood; you feel healthier and you know you've had a good workout," she says. 

If there's one thing you take away from all this, it's that you don't have to be chained to a treadmill to see results. All you have to do is get creative and -- most importantly -- get moving.

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