New app created to help teens kick smoking habit - AmericaNowNews.com

New app created to help teens kick smoking habit

  • New app created to help teens kick smoking habitMore>>

  • How smoking affects kids

    How smoking affects kids

    New studies examine how children who are regularly exposed to second or third-hand smoke are more prone to chest, ear, nose and throat infections.
  • Quit smoking with hypnosis

    Can hypnosis help you kick a bad habit?

    "When I clap, you will dance!" Is that what comes to mind when you think of hypnosis? Well, think again. It's also used in the medical field and it's incredibly relaxing. Celebrities like Matt Damon,
    "When I clap, you will dance!" Is that what comes to mind when you think of hypnosis? Well, think again. It's also used in the medical field and is incredibly relaxing.
  • Foods to help you stop smoking

    Foods that can help you quit smoking

    For once, it may be good to be a quitter – of tobacco, that is. But kicking the habit is hard. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, nicotine may be as addictive as heroin, cocaine, or alcohol.
    For once, it may be good to be a quitter – of tobacco, that is. But kicking the habit is hard, so we turned to the experts at Cleveland Clinic to find out how eating right could help you stamp out your cigarettes for good!

Here's a troubling statistic: the CDC says one in five high schoolers smokes cigarettes. So how is the National Cancer Institute getting kids to kick the habit? Well - they created an app for that.

Dr. Paul Bradley says, "At one time it seemed to be getting a lot better, it does come and go in popularity, but we see an awful lot of teenagers and young adults smoking and starting to smoke."

Dr. Bradley says despite the abundance of knowledge available about the dangers of smoking, today's youngsters are still lighting up. He believes it's for a couple of reasons.

"You've got the social thing like, 'ooh I'm really cool if I smoke', and then you've got the real addiction, and of course the more they smoke the worse the addiction becomes," says Bradley.

The National Cancer Institute wants to stop this addiction, so they've created a mobile phone app to help do so. The smoke free text service sends encouraging alerts to teens wanting to break the habit. 

Dr. Bradley believes this program and others like it are crucial. "There's great smoking cessation programs, anything with a constant reminder, anything that basically taps you on the soldier and says hey this is not good hey you can be strong."

But if you have a teenage son or daughter who smokes, Bradley says do not get discouraged. "Unfortunately, it's all up to the individual and not till that individual comes to the conclusion for their own reasons will they be able to quit."

And the American Lung Association says quitting is the single most important step a smoker can take, as 392,000 people die in the United States each year from tobacco caused-disease.

Copyright 2012 America Now. All rights reserved.
  • Most Popular StoriesMost Popular StoriesMore>>

  • Six deadly foods for dogs

    Six deadly foods for dogs

    Every pet owner knows a dog can get into just about anything around the house. One woman found that out the hard way when her dog ate a bunch of grapes! Turns out, that's one of the most dangerous foods
    Every pet owner knows a dog can get into just about anything around the house. But these common snacks could be fatal for Fido.
  • Physicians warn against giving melatonin to children

    Physicians warn against giving melatonin to children

    Parents desperate to get their troubled sleepers to bed are turning to synthetic melatonin, which is a supplement sold over the counter. But expert warn it could have adverse effects on child development.
    Many adults turn to sleep aids like melatonin, but now more parents are giving them to their kids, too. We talked to physicians to see what they had to say about how it could affect your child's development.
  • Changes to school immunization requirements in Ark.

    Changes to school immunization requirements in Ark.

    Thursday, April 10 2014 4:53 AM EDT2014-04-10 08:53:22 GMT
    (WMC-TV) - Children who will be 11 years of age or older on or before September 1 of each school year will be required to receive a Tdap shot in order to attend public or private school in Arkansas. This
    Children who will be 11 years of age or older on or before September 1 of each school year will be required to receive a Tdap shot in order to attend public or private school in Arkansas. This new requirement is anticipated to be effective September 1, 2014.
Powered by WorldNow