Dieters swear by the 'Caveman Diet' - AmericaNowNews.com

Dieters swear by the 'Caveman Diet'

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    Food and diet myths debunked

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Get ready for this: Eat like a cave man, and your fat will become extinct!

That's the idea behind the Paleo Diet.

Albert Steed is able to do chin-ups with ease, but he wasn't always so fit.

"My wife and other people wonder if someone has body-snatched my mind," said Steed. "Like, who is this guy who is into health and nutrition?"

Steed says he's lost 80 pounds by following what some refer to as the Paleo Diet, or the Cavemen diet, in which participants are supposed to go "back" to basics – essentially, eating like a caveman.

The diet consists of meat, vegetables, fruit and nuts, and followers are instructed to avoid anything that is processed, such as bread and pasta.

Steed swears by it.

"When I started, I weighed 271 pounds," he said. "My current weight is 191 or 192."

The inspiration for his transformation was his family.

"I have a little boy who is four," said Steed. "I wanted to be an active parent, and be around for him and my wife, enjoy the things as a family…to go out and be able to show what it meant to be a man, to be healthy and lead a very productive and active life."

Steed found out about the diet when he started working out at CrossFit Wilmington, the gym that encourages its members not only to work out, but to get more out of their training by following the caveman lifestyle.

CrossFit holds a caveman crash course for its members where they can learn how to lose the weight and get healthy.

Candace Whiteaker attended that course, and for her, it wasn't about losing pounds -- it was about feeling better.

"I've always suffered from headaches and migraines, and since I started this, I don't have to take migraine medicine anymore," said Whiteaker, who has followed the diet for about a month.

She says it hasn't been difficult to stick to the plan, but Steed says he occasionally gives into temptation.

"I really strive for what they say is an 80-percent compliance," said Steed. "If I'm at a party or at an event and there's something that I want, I'm only going to make so many reservations and still be able to live and enjoy my life."

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