Sneezing allows your nose to 'reboot' itself - AmericaNowNews.com

Why sneezing is good for you

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Ever thought about how much your nose and a computer screen have in common?

Researchers have discovered the way they both work shows us why we sneeze.

When your computer crashes and the blue screen appears, the only solution is to shut it down and start again.

Scientists say the same thing happens when you sneeze. You could say it's the way our noses are programmed to ‘reboot.'

"It resets the cilia to beat and move along as it's supposed to," according to Dr. Jonathan Moss with Charlotte Eye, Ear, Nose & Throat Associates in North Carolina.

Cilia are the microscopic hairs located inside our nose that clears out dust, dirt and mucus.

Our nose and sinuses produce about four cups of mucus every day.

Healthy cilia and a good sneeze clears out all of our nasal clutter.

However, people who suffer from sinusitis have cilia that isn't able to perform this routine housekeeping task.

For those individuals Moss says, "The sneeze doesn't work properly; it doesn't clear out the nose."

Researchers say that's why people with sinusitis sneeze more often, because their nose can't completely reboot.

The force of a sneeze gives your nose a fresh start, and that's why doctors say you shouldn't try to suppress or hold a sneeze in.

"Sneezing is a good thing," Moss says.

Since its what's your body is designed to do, let it out -- just don't share it with everyone else!  

Researchers hope that by better understanding why we sneeze will lead to new and better treatments for sinusitis.

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Additional Information:

The following information was published in the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology journal in an article entitled "Molecular modulation of airway epithelial ciliary response to sneezing" (Source: http://www.fasebj.org/content/26/8/3178.abstract). 

  • Sneezing is the body's natural reboot and that patients with disorders of the nose such as sinusitis can't reboot, explaining why they sneeze more often than others
  • When a sneeze works properly, it resets the environment within nasal passages so "bad" particles breathed in through the nose can be trapped. The sneeze is accomplished by biochemical signals that regulate the beating of cilia (microscopic hairs) on the cells that line our nasal cavities.
  • To make this discovery, researchers used cells from the noses of mice which were grown in incubators and measured how these cells cleared mucus. They examined how the cells responded to a simulated sneeze (puff of air) by analyzing the cells' biochemical responses. Some of the experiments were replicated in human sinus and nasal tissue removed from patients with and without sinusitis. They found that cells from patients with sinusitis do not respond to sneezes in the same manner as cells obtained from patients who do not have sinusitis. The researchers speculate that sinusitis patients sneeze more frequently because their sneezes fail to reset the nasal environment properly or are less efficient at doing so.


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