Study finds many parents ignore child safety seat guidelines - AmericaNowNews.com

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Study finds many parents ignore child safety seat guidelines

  • SafetyStudy finds many parents ignore child safety seat guidelinesMore>>

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A new study shows many parents and caregivers are ignoring the recommended guidelines for child safety in cars.

Investigators looked through at least three years of research: More than 21,000 children make up the data.

The new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine shows many children between birth to 13 years old are riding in the wrong seats, or in the front seat too early.

The study found children are not in rear-facing child seats past age one, very few are using booster seats after seven years old and too many children over age six are riding in the front seat.

Experts say some parents may be too eager to move their child along and that means a lack of protection.

Here are the national recommendations: Have a child in a rear facing seat until age two, in a forward facing seat for as long as the child is under the height and weight limit, a booster until the seat belt fits properly and no riding in the front seat until 13 years old or even driving age.

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