How to crush sugar cravings - AmericaNowNews.com

How to crush sugar cravings

According to America Now Wellness Expert Peggy Hall, sugar is arguably one of the most addicting foods. The more you eat, the more you crave!

Peggy explains why sugar is so appealing, and how to banish those cravings:

1. Refined sugar (like white and brown sugar) has zero nutritional value, so your body has to steal B vitamins, magnesium and other important minerals from your own reserves in order to metabolize it. Peggy says that's one reason why eating too much can leave you feeling run-down and craving more...you're depleting your body of valuable nutrients!

2. Because your body considers itself undernourished, it compels you to seek out the fastest source of quick energy, which is -- you guessed it -- sugar! It enters the bloodstream rapidly, give you a temporary lift, then a crash.

3. To short-circuit those sugar cravings, Peggy recommends that you eat sufficient protein: about 20 grams (3 to 4 ounces) at each meal.  "Meat, fish, eggs, chicken, cheese, yogurt, beans are high in protein and an amino acid called tryptophan, which helps the body produce feel-good brain hormones like serotonin and dopamine," Peggy explains. "Guess what helps gives us a burst of serotonin and dopamine? Sugar!"

4. Stress, poor nutrition and the lack of sleep, exercise and sunlight can all deplete serotonin/dopamine levels. So it's no surprise that when you're feeling tired, hungry or moody you might grab the first high-sugar, high-carb thing that comes to mind.

5. Going for a brisk walk outside is a great way to short-circuit those sugar cravings Peggy says, "Breathe deeply. Smile. Sunshine, fresh air and a positive outlook are natural pick-me-ups!"

6.  For a quick snack when the sugar cravings hit, try this: Sliced grapefruit wedges dipped in sesame seeds. Grapefruit contains certain compounds that increase serotonin and in turn decrease sugar cravings. The citrusy scent also acts as a mental stimulant, so you'll feel less likely to turn to sugar as a pick-me-up. The sesame seeds add a satisfying crunch and a healthy source of fat to keep you fuller longer.

Peggy says that any fruit is a great source of natural sugar, but grapefruit in particular contains a specific flavanoid called nargingenin that helps to quell cravings.

One word of caution: Grapefruit interacts with certain prescription drugs, so check with your doctor first. Another option is to savor a juicy orange, which also contains narginenin, but at lower amounts.

Copyright 2013 America Now. All rights reserved.

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