How to saute at home - AmericaNowNews.com

How to saute at home

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Sauteed foods are popular in restaurants across the country, but many people don't know how to saute food on their own at home.

"Sauteing is a technique that's used in professional kitchens all the time, but at home it's one of the techniques I use more than almost any other thing I do in the kitchen," says Chef Susan Feniger. "This means fast cooking. The food jumps! ‘Saute' actually means jumping the food in the pan and the reason we are doing this is because we want to be able to keep all the flavor still in the meat or in the vegetables and not let it end up in the pan."

One thing to remember is get your pan good and hot. You should be able to hear the butter or oil pop when you add it to the pan.

"When you're flipping, you don't flip when you're sauteing, throwing the pan," Susan explains. "You actually flip it in the pan tilting it. You can practice with a piece of bread."

She also notes that you shouldn't overcrowd the pan.  

"Always keep in mind a big enough pan, a hot enough pan, and not too much in the pan at one time, and cut your vegetables all about the same size," says Susan. "But really, just remember cooking is all about having fun! There's no right or wrong. If you love it, that's perfection."

Another tip: If you need to cook something that's going to take a little bit longer to cook, like a piece of marinated meat, and you want that temperature really high, use a vegetable oil to saute. Vegetable oil has a higher burning point, meaning that the oil won't burn as quick. If it's something like sauteed corn and you want the flavor of the oil, Susan recommends using an olive oil. 

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