Dog-napping up by 32 percent - AmericaNowNews.com

Dog-nappings up by 32 percent

  • Dog-napping up by 32 percentMore>>

  • Helping a stray dog

    Helping a stray dog

    Many of us have witnessed the heartbreaking sight of a lost or confused dog running down the street in danger. What can you do to help?
    Many of us have witnessed the heartbreaking sight of a lost or confused dog running down the street in danger. What can you do to help?
  • Pets

    Microchips help track missing pets

    Microchips help track lost or stolen pets

    According to the American Kennel Club, more dogs are being stolen by the year. Microchipping your pet is the best way to increase your chances of being reunited.
    According to the American Kennel Club, more dogs are being stolen by the year. Microchipping your pet is the best way to increase your chances of being reunited.
  • What to do if your dog goes missing

    What to do if your dog goes missing

    Here's a startling statistic from the ASPCA: Less than 20 percent of lost dogs are returned to their rightful owners. Our pet pro, Luciano Aguilar, shares tips on how you can raise the odds of finding your Fido.
    Here's a startling statistic from the ASPCA: Less than 20 percent of lost dogs are returned to their rightful owners. Our pet pro, Luciano Aguilar, shares tips on how you can raise the odds of finding your Fido.

The ASPCA and the American Kennel Club are warning that pet theft is on the rise. Dognapping in particular has increased by 32 percent. 

Not only do security camera videos show just how fast it can happen, they also reveal the lengths to which some determined thieves will go to steal somebody's dog.

America Now's Leeza Gibbons sat down with Lieutenant Alan Hamilton of the Los Angeles Police Department to find out more about this cold-hearted crime.

"We've had specific cases here in the San Fernando Valley where pets are stolen. And it's kind of like they're being ransomed almost, because you know that reward poster is going to go up as soon as that pet is taken," Hamilton explained.


Some people are very close to their pets and they're willing to pay a lot of money to get their pets back. Dognappers are taking advantage of that.

"I was one of those people," said Leeza. "My little dog went missing. I actually hired a pet detective. Found out that someone contacted me and said, 'we have your dog.'"

Gibbons' husband met with the dognappers. Unfortunately, they were able to get the ransom money but did not hand over the dog.

Leeza said a lot of people fear that their dogs, especially the little ones, have been stolen and sold for product experimentation to research laboratories, because there is good money in it.

"[Dognappers] get money for that," said Lt. Hamilton. "And then there's also a secondary market for well-kept pets where they're actually selling them on Craigslist and on the internet."

Now the LAPD uses undercover operations in the San Fernando Valley, where this activity continues to take place. In one situation, they sent in an undercover officer who eventually arrested three dognappers.

The ASPCA has some important tips for keeping your dog safe:

1. Never leave your dog unattended in a front yard on its own. Dognappers will notice that dog is not being watched and it can easily be taken.

2. When you're out running errands, don't leave your dog in the car and resist the urge to tie your pet up outside the store. An opportunistic thief can walk by and your dog can be gone in the blink of an eye.

3. Keep a close eye on your dog in off-leash areas, too, just to make sure that the dog doesn't wander off and go home with somebody unexpectedly.

4. Make sure that you microchip your pet and register the microchip online. If your dog goes missing, the implanted microchip can be scanned to reveal that you are the rightful owner.


Copyright 2013 America Now. All rights reserved.
  • Most Popular StoriesMost Popular StoriesMore>>

  • Physicians warn against giving melatonin to children

    Physicians warn against giving melatonin to children

    Parents desperate to get their troubled sleepers to bed are turning to synthetic melatonin, which is a supplement sold over the counter. But expert warn it could have adverse effects on child development.
    Many adults turn to sleep aids like melatonin, but now more parents are giving them to their kids, too. We talked to physicians to see what they had to say about how it could affect your child's development.
  • Six deadly foods for dogs

    Six deadly foods for dogs

    Every pet owner knows a dog can get into just about anything around the house. One woman found that out the hard way when her dog ate a bunch of grapes! Turns out, that's one of the most dangerous foods
    Every pet owner knows a dog can get into just about anything around the house. But these common snacks could be fatal for Fido.
  • Mouse droppings cause disease

    Mouse droppings cause respiratory disease

    Mice are one of the most resilient mammals living on the planet. Some people have them as pets, and they're also used in laboratory experiments. If wild mice get inside your house, they can potentially
    If wild mice find a way inside your home, they can potentially cause thousands of dollars worth of damage to your drywall and insulation. They can also transmit a harmful disease which can cause death in humans. 
Powered by WorldNow