Have you seen Molly? - AmericaNowNews.com

Health

Have you seen Molly? Details about this dangerous form of ecstasy

Have you seen Molly? She's been around for a long time, but over the past year, she's become the "it" girl at parties and in the music world, name-dropped by everyone from Madonna and Kanye West to Juicy J and Miley Cyrus.

So who is Molly and why is she dangerous?

"It will kill people," said Marshall Fisher, director of the Mississippi Bureau of Narcotics. "It's a type of ecstasy. It's still ecstasy, but it's a much purer form, a lot stronger than the regular pills - sometimes maybe 100 times stronger."

The most common users are between the ages of 16 and 25, making it even more important for parents to listen up and learn because several popular songs are laced with "Molly."

Jackson State professor Doctor D'Andra Orey says the clever wording is no mistake.

"When an artist, as the kids say, drop it in their lyrics, then they simply are endorsing it and that's the way they see it," he said. "As an endorsement of the drug, surely they can't be telling me anything wrong."

Dr. Orey argues the music becomes another form of peer pressure and hearing about Molly repeatedly can affect a young mind.

"If you don't have the words associated with this particular drug in your vocabulary or in your mindset then it's easier to reject the drug," said Dr. Orey.

Molly is short for molecule, and the drug is found in various forms, from powder to crystal.

It's commonly put into gel capsules.

"People can snort it, crush it up, put it in a drink and swallow it, take it in a capsule, or in powder form," Marshall Fisher explained.

While the name may sound innocent, the side effects are far from it, including spikes in heart rate, blood pressure, and body temperature.

Even more disturbing is its availability.

"It's looked upon in the culture that uses it as less harmful, as less evil, so to speak than the meth or the cocaine," Fisher said. "It's been identified as the love drug because it sort of softens people's inhibitions and they want to hug everybody."

Officers warn you could be hugging jail bars if you're busted with Molly, or much worse. Too much Molly can kill.

So why is Molly so popular now? In December, MTV News quoted Three-Six Mafia's Juicy J as saying people are simply more open about it now.

All the more reason for parents to take notice.

Copyright 2013 America Now. All rights reserved

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