Day after DUIs: "Sleeping it off" doesn't always work - AmericaNowNews.com

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Day after DUIs: "Sleeping it off" doesn't always work

Imagine going to a big party. You have a few too many, but the next morning you think you're good to go. However, we've uncovered that you could actually still be drunk.

DUI defense attorney James Nesci has been defending suspects for 18 years.  He says he's seeing a new trend on our roadways.  Law enforcement calls it "day after DUIs."  It's when people get arrested the day after drinking, some on their way to work.

Day after DUIs are something law enforcement is keeping a close eye on.  Sergeant Jason Dowdy with the Southern Arizona DUI task force says most people don't know how much time it takes for their body to get rid of alcohol.  He says some people may sleep a few hours and when they wake up, they find themselves still impaired.

"If that person is going out drinking the night before, they get up early the next day they still have enough alcohol in their system to make it unsafe for them to drive a vehicle," Dowdy said.

Attorney Nesci agrees and says the bottom line is if you feel too drunk to drive, you probably are. "How quickly you get to that level, depends on what's in your stomach," Nesci said. "It depends upon how much you drink, how fast you drink, your body weight."

Experts say for the average person, it takes a while for alcohol to get out of your system.  In fact, if you go out and drink a six pack of beer, it'll take more than six hours for the alcohol to leave your body.  And the more you drink, the longer it will take. In fact, there are a lot of misconceptions about what can sober you up, such as coffee, a nap or a cold shower - but they say the only thing that can make you sober is time.

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