Scam Alert: Beware fake emails from 'government officials' - AmericaNowNews.com

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Scam Alert: Beware fake emails from 'government officials'

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Sara Nadolny is a well educated business woman. She's seen scam emails before, but the one she got recently was different. So she did some research on the Internet.

"When I searched, I mean theses were legit sites that I pulled up. His information is online. So it was all right for me to see. Oh this person does exist," says Nadolny.

The email is signed from Richard L. Duncan, Assistant General Manager for public safety at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport in Atlanta.

He is real, but upon further investigation about the origins of the email, it's been traced to Seoul, South Korea.

Dick Epstein from the Better Business Bureau says people from other countries are searching the Internet for real names and agencies, then sending emails to people just like Sara using real people's information as decoys.   

It's not just the airport either, Epstien says they are using administrators' names from the FBI, the FTC, the IRS and more.

Notice in the email Sara got how the scammers didn't ask for money, just her phone number and address. Epstein says the crooks will spoof their real phone numbers, change them up, so when you caller ID it looks like the call is really from a company.

Epstein says, "we talked to senior citizens or family members of senior citizens who are swindled out of tens of thousands of dollars virtually every week."

With that in mind keep yourselves protected by following one simple rule. "If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is."

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