What to do if you're involved in a hit and run accident - AmericaNowNews.com

Auto

What to do if you're involved in a hit and run accident

Law enforcement agencies across the country are reporting an increase in hit and run accidents — more and more drivers are simply fleeing the scene.

Crossing the street, none of us ever expects to be hit by a car and if that driver flees the scene without stopping, it can become a serious crime, especially, when it involves a fatality.

Sixteen-year old Conor Lynch was the victim of a hit and run driver. A car struck Conor while he was running with other members of the track team on a street near his school. The car that hit him threw him about 75 yards onto the other side of the oncoming traffic so hard that he lost his shoes. There was no braking. No stopping. Conor was killed instantly.

Law enforcement authorities say there are many reasons why people run. No insurance, drinking and drugs, no license, or just fear. However, Sgt. Denise Joslin says drivers everywhere are required by law to stop after an accident and make sure the other person isn't injured.

If you decide to flee the scene of a collision after you've been involved in that incident, as the hit and run driver, you face additional consequences that include fines and prosecution that could very well land you in jail. If you are the victim, witness, or perpetrator of a hit and run it is far simpler to stay at the scene of the crime. 

Sgt. Denise Joslin also says to not be the vigilante. "You don't need to chase that individual down. Simply remain where you are. Call 911 and make sure that you make note, if you can of the other vehicle—the make, model, and the color. It really helps us if you can get the full license plate. You also want to get the identity of the driver—their gender, approximate age, hair color, even clothing description can be useful for us. It's important to note that if there are any witnesses in the surrounding area to get their name and their phone number."

The driver who killed Conor did turn herself in and ultimately, did not serve any jail time. 

Copyright 2013 America Now. All rights reserved.

  • Most Popular StoriesMost Popular StoriesMore>>

  • Physicians warn against giving melatonin to children

    Physicians warn against giving melatonin to children

    Parents desperate to get their troubled sleepers to bed are turning to synthetic melatonin, which is a supplement sold over the counter. But expert warn it could have adverse effects on child development.
    Many adults turn to sleep aids like melatonin, but now more parents are giving them to their kids, too. We talked to physicians to see what they had to say about how it could affect your child's development.
  • Six deadly foods for dogs

    Six deadly foods for dogs

    Every pet owner knows a dog can get into just about anything around the house. One woman found that out the hard way when her dog ate a bunch of grapes! Turns out, that's one of the most dangerous foods
    Every pet owner knows a dog can get into just about anything around the house. But these common snacks could be fatal for Fido.
  • Wiping the "sleep" from your eyes

    Why not to wipe the "sleep" from your eyes

    The Sandman may lull you to sleep, but he also leaves a few sprinkles behind in the corners of your eyes. People call it sleep, eye goop, crusties or sand, but no matter what you call it, the gunk keeps
    The Sandman may lull you to sleep, but he also leaves a few sprinkles behind in the corners of your eyes. People call it sleep, eye goop, crusties or sand, and no matter what you call it, it always appears after you've awoken.
Powered by WorldNow